Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020 overview

Welcome to the overview of Microsoft’s June 2020 security patch day. Microsoft releases security updates for all its products on the second Tuesday of the month. This overview provides you with detailed information on the released patches.
It includes links to the security patches as well as an Excel spreadsheet that lists all released security updates. You find direct download links of the latest cumulative updates for supported versions of Windows, the list of known issues, and other information that are useful when it comes to the released patches.
If you have missed out last month’s Patch Day overview, check it out here.
Microsoft Windows Security Updates June 2020

Download the linked Excel spreadsheet to your local system: it contains a list of released security updates that Microsoft released on the June 2020 Patch Day. Click on the following link to download the file to your system: microsoft-windows-security-updates-june-2020
Executive Summary

Microsoft released security updates for all supported versions of Windows (client and server).
Security updates are also available for Microsoft Edge (classic and Chromium), Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, Windows Defender, Visual Studio, Microsoft Apps for Android, Windows App Store, System Center, and other Microsoft products.
The following Windows products have known issues: Windows 10 version 1607, 1809, 1903, and 1909, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server 2019, Windows Server version 1903 and 1909.

Operating System Distribution

Windows 7  (extended support only): 30 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 27 important

CVE-2020-1281 | Windows OLE Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1299 | LNK Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1300 | Windows Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows 8.1: 37 vulnerabilities: 3 rated critical and 34 rated important

same critical vulnerabilities as Windows 7

Windows 10 version 1803: 78 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 74 important

CVE-2020-1281 | Windows OLE Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1286 | Windows Shell Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1299 | LNK Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1300 | Windows Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows 10 version 1809: 82 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 78 important

same critical vulnerabilities as Windows 10 version 1803

Windows 10 version 1903: 91 vulnerabilities: 5 critical and 73 important

same as Windows 10 version 1803 plus
CVE-2020-1248 | GDI+ Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows 10 version 1909: 

same as Windows 10 version 1903

Windows 10 version 2004:

Windows Server products

Windows Server 2008 R2 (extended support only): 30 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 27 important

CVE-2020-1281 | Windows OLE Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1299 | LNK Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1300 | Windows Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows Server 2012 R2: 37 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 34 important.

same as Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2016: 60 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 57 important.

same as Windows Server 2008 R2

Windows Server 2019: 81 vulnerabilities: 4 critical and 77 are important

CVE-2020-1281 | Windows OLE Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1286 | Windows Shell Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1299 | LNK Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1300 | Windows Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Other Microsoft Products

Internet Explorer 11: 7 vulnerability: 3 critical, 4 important

CVE-2020-1213 | VBScript Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1216 | VBScript Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1260 | VBScript Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Microsoft Edge:  4 vulnerabilities: 2 critical, 2 important

CVE-2020-1073 | Scripting Engine Memory Corruption Vulnerability
CVE-2020-1219 | Microsoft Browser Memory Corruption Vulnerability

Microsoft Edge on Chromium:

see here (latest security patches from the Chromium project)

Windows Security Updates
Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2

Monthly Rollup: KB4561643
Security-Only: KB4561669

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder. (Monthly Rollup only)
Security Updates.

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2008 R2

Monthly Rollup: KB4561666 
Security-Only: KB4561673

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder. (Monthly Rollup only)
Security Updates.

Windows 10 version 1803

Support page: KB4561621

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
Security updates

Windows 10 version 1809

Support page: KB4561608 

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
Fixed an issue that caused the promotion of a server to a domain controller to fail.
Security updates.

Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909

Support page: KB4560960 

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
Security updates

Windows 10 version 2004

Support page: KB4557957 

Fixes and improvements

Fixed an issue that prevented users from updating .msi files from a network folder.
Fixed an issue that prevented users from using voice commands in Windows Mixed Reality if the display language was set to English (Canada) or English (Australia).
Improved the reliability of voice assistants that use Windows voice activation for keywords.
Improved the reliability of Cortana’s voice activation on devices that support low-power keywords.
Security updates

Other security updates
KB4561603 — Cumulative security update for Internet Explorer: June 9, 2020
KB4561600 — 2020-06 Security Update for Adobe Flash Player for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004
KB4561612 — 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4561645 — 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Server 2008
KB4561670 — 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Server 2008
KB4561674 — 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4557957 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004
KB4561602 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1709
KB4561605 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1703
KB4561616 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 Version 1607
KB4561649 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1507
Servicing Stack Updates
KB4560366 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server, version 2004 and Windows 10 Version 2004
KB4560959 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server, version 1909, Windows 10 Version 1909, Windows Server 2019 (1903), and Windows 10 Version 1903
KB4562030 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4562031 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2008
KB4562249 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1507
KB4562561 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2016 and Windows 10 Version 1607
KB4562250 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1703
KB4562560 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1709
KB4562251 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 10 Version 1803
KB4562562 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2019 and Windows 10 Version 1809
KB4562252 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4562253 — 2020-06 Servicing Stack Update for Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2
Known Issues
Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2

Error “Failure to Configure Windows Updates. Reverting Changes. Do not Turn off your computer. “may be displayed.

Expected behavior if the update is installed on non-ESU joined devices.

Windows 10 version 1809

Devices with some Asian language packs installed may display the error “0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND”.

Workaround 1: uninstall and install recently added language packs. Select check for updates.
Workaround 2: Reset the PC.

Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909

Internet connectivity may not be available after installing the update on devices with wireless wide area network LTE modems. The Network Connectivity Status Indicator may still show that the device is connected to the Internet.

Microsoft is working on a resolution.

Security advisories and updates
ADV200009 | Windows DNS Server Denial of Service Vulnerability
ADV200010 | June 2020 Adobe Flash Security Update
Non-security related updates
Microsoft Office Updates
You find Office update information here.
How to download and install the June 2020 security updates
Microsoft releases security updates for Windows via Windows Updates and other update management services such as WSUS. Administrators may download updates directly as well to install them manually.
It is advised to back up the system before updates are applied.
If you don’t want to wait, do the following to run an update check on Windows.
Do the following to check for new updates:

Open the Start Menu of the Windows operating system, type Windows Update and select the result.
Select check for updates in the application that opens. Updates may be installed automatically when they are found or offered by Windows; this depends on the operating system and version that is used, and update settings.

Direct update downloads
Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2

KB4561643 — 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7
KB4561669 — 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 7

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2

KB4561666 — 2020-06 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1
KB4561673 — 2020-06 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 8.1

Windows 10 (version 1803)

KB4561621 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1803

Windows 10 (version 1809)

KB4561608 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1903)

KB4560960 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903

Windows 10 (version 1909)

KB4560960 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1909

Windows 10 (version 2004)

KB4557957 — 2020-06 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 2004

Additional resources

June  2020 Security Updates release notes
List of software updates for Microsoft products
List of the latest Windows Updates and Services Packs
Security Updates Guide
Microsoft Update Catalog site
Our in-depth Windows update guide
How to install optional updates on Windows 10
Windows 10 Update History
Windows 8.1 Update History
Windows 7 Update History

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Source: ghacks.net

Dell and Lenovo publish list of tested devices compatible with Windows 10 version 2004

How do you find out if a particular device is compatible with Microsoft’s latest version of Windows 10, Windows 10 version 2004 or the May 2020 update? While you could give it a try and see how it goes, it is usually better to find out if a device is compatible before you run the update.
Windows Update might block the update on the device as Microsoft tends to roll out updates over time and blocks certain devices from getting the update. All bets are off on the other hand if you install the operating system using an ISO image. You will notice that a device is not compatible during installation, but that means spending some time up to that point.
PC manufacturers Dell and Lenovo have published compatibility lists. These cover devices that the companies have tested to find out if a device is compatible with the new Windows version.
It is a good idea for Dell and Lenovo PC owners to check the compatibility list first before the update is installed.
Tip: you may also want to check Microsoft’s list of known issues of Windows 10 version 2004.
Lenovo

Lenovo customers may point the web browser of their choice to this support page on the Lenovo website. You may enter a serial number at the top to find your PC or laptop, use the “select your product” option, or use Ctrl-F to find it in the listing.
Lenovo lists the following product families as the main entry points.

ThinkPad laptops
Lenovo Notebook/Ideapad
ThinkCentre+AIO
IdeaCentre+AIO
ThinkStation

Limitations may be displayed below each product category listing that highlight specific issues for certain devices. Workarounds and mitigations may be displayed to resolve the issue, e.g. by installing a newer driver or even restoring the older version of Windows.
Dell

Dell’s support page lists product groups and devices as well. The company provides information on determining the computer model; helpful for customers who don’t know the exact make and model of the device. Everyone else may use Ctrl-F to jump to the device directly on the page.
All devices listed by Dell have been tested for compatibility and should work with the Windows 10 version 2004 operating system.
Dell notes that it has not tested any other models and that it won’t provide driver updates for untested devices.
Closing Words
The compatibility listings are helpful but it is still possible that a feature update may not install correctly; incompatibilities may be caused by installed applications or additional hardware devices.
Devices not listed on the manufacturer’s website may still receive the Windows 10 version 2004 update just fine, as not being listed on the page simply means that the device has not been tested by Dell or Lenovo.
Now You: Do you check the compatibility of your devices before you run updates? (via Deskmodder)
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Source: ghacks.net

Windows Update stuck? Here is what you may do to fix it

Over the years, I ran into several issues regarding updates on Windows devices. A common issue that I experienced regularly was that updates appeared stuck after the initial reboot. Windows would display a percentage, e.g. 0%, 100% or any figure in between, and would seemingly not move that number or complete the process.
Common messages that you may receive:

Configuring update for Windows 10. 0% complete. Do not turn off your computer.
Failure configuring Windows updates. Reverting changes. Do not turn off your computer.

While I never experienced hour-long wait times like others have, I asked myself more than once whether the update was still ongoing.
Since I ran into the issue recently again when I updated one Windows 10 device to the new Windows 10 version 2004, I thought it would be a good idea to provide some guidance on how to deal with the situation.
Preparations

Unless you are experiencing the situation right now, you may want to prepare for the issue and others that you may experience.
The most important step is to create a backup before you install updates. Windows comes with its own recovery options but these may fail, and if they do, you may be in for a lengthy repair session or a re-installation of Windows if you have install media at hand.
A backup solves this right away as you can restore the original state of the system prior to the update installation attempt. Make sure that you have bootable media at hand that boots the backup software if Windows does not boot anymore.
You can use free tools like Paragon Backup & Recovery, Macrium Reflect, or others.
Date and time when the update is installed is of importance as well. It is usually not a good idea to run updates at the beginning of a work day or when you need to use the computer for important tasks.
It is best to install updates at times when access to the device is not needed, e.g. in the evening or on the weekend. That way, if the installation takes longer, you may be less anxious and more relaxed.
Last but not least, it is advised to check the list of known issues before you install updates. Not all potential issues are listed by Microsoft, but you may find issues listed that apply to your device, e.g. its hardware or software.
Analyzing stuck Windows Updates
If the installation of the update takes a long time, you may wonder whether it is stuck or not; you may have the impression of the percentage value does not move, e.g. seems stuck at a specific value, or if the update takes a very long time to complete.
Watch and Listen!
You may want to check for hard disk activity first. Not all PCs or laptops show hard disk activity but if yours does, e.g. a blinking light, you may determine whether the hard disk is used. If it is used, chance is good that the update is still underway.
Sometimes, you may be able to hear if the hard drive is being used; this won’t work with SSD storage devices but it may work with platter-based drives. Similarly, you may see or hear if the CPU is being used.
Wait or reboot?
You need to figure out whether it is best to wait or to reboot the system. If you conclude that the update is stuck, you may want to reboot to — hopefully — kick of the recovery process. Otherwise, you may want to wait and see if the update installation continues.
If you reboot, you may see a message stating that Windows is reverted back to the previous state. Note that this may also take some time to complete and that you may run into stuck issues here as well.
Usually though, you will end up with a restored system. If you are unlucky, Windows may enter into a loop that you cannot get out anymore. A backup, system restore, or other means of restoring a previous Windows state need to be used in that case. A reboot may also result in the continuation of the update installation, but there is no guarantee that it will not appear to be stuck again if that happens.
General advice

Make sure you create backups before you install updates on Windows.
Waiting is usually better than rebooting or powering the computer down if the update appears stuck; unless, you waited a long time already, say one or two hours, and nothing seems to have happened (no apparent computer activity).
If you manage to boot a previous state, e.g. after the restoration of a backup, you may want to check the system before you re-run the update. Options that you may want to consider include:

Checking free disk storage. If there is little, updates may take a lot longer.
Checking known issues or Internet sites for potential reports of the issue that you encountered.
Uninstalling software that you don’t require and that may interfere with updates, e.g. antivirus software.

Now You: how do you deal with seemingly stuck Windows updates?
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Windows Update stuck? Here is what you may do to fix it appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

How to block the new Microsoft Edge on Windows 10 devices

Microsoft started the rollout of the new Microsoft Edge web browser that is based on Chromium via Windows Update this week. It is pushed to Windows 10 devices using Windows Update, but only if the new Edge is not installed already on the device.
The new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser is seen as a big improvement by many as it uses the same core as Google Chrome; that means better web compatibility and that it is faster, that users may install Google Chrome extensions, and more.
The new browser does not replicate the full feature set of the classic Edge browser on the other hand; some organizations may want to keep on using the classic version of Microsoft Edge for a period of time.
Microsoft continues to support the classic Edge with security updates but it won’t add any new features to it. It is therefore not a problem to keep the classic version of Microsoft Edge installed on a system for the time being.
Administrators may block the deployment of the Chromium-based Edge browser by adding a value to the Registry. If set correctly, Windows Update will not download and install the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge browser on the system.
Note: the value can only be set if the new Edge is not installed already on the device.

Here is how that is done:

Tap on the Start key, type regedit.exe and hit the Enter-key to start the Registry Editor.
Confirm the UAC prompt if it is displayed.
Go to the key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoft.
Find the key EdgeUpdate.
Right-click on EdgeUpdate and select New > Dword (32-bit) Value.
Name the value DoNotUpdateToEdgeWithChromium.
Double-click on the newly generated Dword and set its data value to 1.
Restart the computer.

A value of 1 means that the update to the Chromium-based Edge browser is blocked. Delete the newly created Dword at a later point in time to allow the update.
Now You: Classic or new Microsoft Edge, which do you favor, and why?
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Source: ghacks.net

Here is how you disable Cortana from autostarting with Windows 10 version 2004

Microsoft released Windows 10 version 2004, a new feature update for the operating system recently. One of the changes of the release was that the company switched from integrating Cortana natively in the operating system to offering it as an application that is provided via the Microsoft Store.
The move did not just cut the tie between Windows 10 and Cortana as Microsoft rebuild the new Cortana application from scratch; some functionality, most consumer features such as controlling music playback, are no longer available in the Cortana application and Microsoft stated already that these features would not be reintroduced at a later point in time. The new focus is business and work according to Microsoft, and using Cortana requires that users sign-in to the application with a Microsoft Account, or a school / work account.
While Cortana has changed significantly, it still appears that the application is started with Windows. Our colleagues over at Deskmodder noticed this. We tried to replicate this on a system that we upgraded to Windows 10 version 2004 but saw no sign of Cortana starting with Windows directly after the upgrade to Windows 10 version 2004.
The first Microsoft Store update on the other hand brought a Cortana update along with it, and this update seems to have added Cortana to the system autostart.
Tip: you may also disable Microsoft Store updates as outlined in this guide to prevent Cortana from updating automatically.
Be it as it may, you may want to check if Cortana is autostarting on your devices if you have upgraded to Windows 10 version 2004. If you have no plans on using Cortana, you may as well disable its autostart.
Disable Cortana in the Task Manager

One of the easier options to do that is to open the Task Manager on the system using Ctrl-Shift-Esc, switch to the Startup tab, and see if Cortana is listed there. A right-click and the selection of “disable” blocks the new Cortana from autostarting with Windows.
Cortana application options

Another option that you have is to open the Cortana options as you find an autostart toggle there as well. Here is how that is done:

Use Windows-I to open the Settings application, or select Start > Settings.
Open Apps in the Settings window.
Search for Cortana and click on the result to display its options.
Select Advanced Options.
Toggle the “runs at log-in” option on the page that opens.

Disable Cortana autostart via the Registry

You have to dig deep to find the autostart of the Cortana application as it is not listed in the usual places. To disable Cortana autostarting with Windows, do the following:

Open Start, type regedit.exe and hit the Enter-key on the keyboard.
Confirm the UAC prompt that is displayed.
Go to the key HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTLocal SettingsSoftwareMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionAppModelSystemAppDataMicrosoft.549981C3F5F10_8wekyb3d8bbweCortanaStartupId
You should see a State value on the right. Double-click it and set it..

to 1 to disable the autostart of Cortana.
to 2 to enable the autostart of the Cortana application.

Restart Windows to complete the change.

Now You: do you plan to use the new Cortana application?
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Spydish: quickly check Windows 10 Group Policy privacy settings

Spydish is a tiny program for Windows 10 by the developer of Debotnet and SharpApp designed to provide a quick overview of important Group Policy privacy settings.
The privacy tool has been released as a beta by its developer. Interested users may download the latest version of the application from the developer’s GitHub project site. It is a 35 Kilobyte zip archive that you need to unpack once it has been downloaded to the local system. You may run it from any location without installation. Note that it requires administrative privileges.
Tip: check out our overview of Windows 10 privacy tools here.
Spydish

The main idea behind Spydish is simple: check if privacy related policies are set on the Windows 10 system it is run on. The program displays a list of privacy related policies in a sidebar on the left. You may select all or some of the policies for checking, and hit the analyze button to check the status of each selected policies.
Policies are grouped, and each group can be selected individually in the sidebar. A quick check of the supported policies confirms that major privacy policies are supported by the application; this includes support for policies such as “Enable Telemetry”, “Block automatic installation of apps”, “Disable Bing in Windows Search”, or “Disable Windows Defender”.
A click or tap on the analyze button checks each policy and returns its setting. Spydish color codes results and displays a status for each policies, e.g. not configured or configured, as well.
The application supports two additional features: revert policies and apply policies.
Revert policies changes the status of all selected policies to the default status (which usually is not configured”. Apply policies on the other hand enables the selected policies when selected. Both options are quite useful.
Administrators may use the application to get a quick rundown of privacy settings on a Windows 10 machine. Additionally, it is useful to restore policies to defaults or to enable certain private policies on a device. The latter may be of special interest on Home systems of Windows 10 as the Group Policy is not available on these systems (but policies may still be set using the Registry). The app may provide a quicker way of doing so.
Compatibility information is not provided on the developer site or on GitHub. The program displays 1903 in the interface (on a Windows 10 version 1909 system). Since it is beta, it is advised to create backups before you use the program to make changes to the system.
Now You: do you use privacy tools? if so which, and why? (via Deskmodder)
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Run Local User and Group Management on Windows Home devices

Some Windows features are reserved to specific editions of the operating system. Home editions are usually the editions with the least features; features such as Group Policy, Bitlocker device encryption, support for Active Directory or Azure Active Directory, Windows Sandbox, Hyper-V are not supported by Home versions of Windows. Additionally, Home systems are limited when it comes to the maximum amount of RAM (128 Gigabytes).
Another feature that is not supported by default is the Local User and Group Management snap-in lusrmgr.msc. It is used to manage local users and groups on the Windows device; it can be used to enable or disable accounts (including the built-in administrator account), delete or rename users, or manage members of groups on the system.
GitHub user proviq created a program for all editions of Windows to gain access to the functionality. The program works with all versions and editions of windows starting with Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008; this includes Windows 7, 8.1 and 10 as well as Server editions. A test on Windows 10 Home confirmed the claim for that particular version.
All it takes is to download the file lusrmgr.exe to the local system and run it. Note that it requires the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 or higher, and that defensive systems such as SmartScreen may display warnings that the program is dangerous. The reason for the latter is that it is not digitally signed.
The program requires elevated privileges (which should be clear). The interface looks a bit different to that of lusrmgr.msc on first glance but there are also similarities.

The local system and its users and groups categories are listed on the left. A click on users or groups opens the list of available user accounts and user groups on the right.
You may connect to remote machines to manage users and groups remotely using the application.
A search is available to find entries quickly; this is useful if the count exceeds a certain number as it may be quicker than scrolling to a particular user or group.
As far as functionality is concerned, it is possible to create and delete users, edit user properties, and to rename users.

Editing opens a tabbed window to look at and edit certain user profile characteristics. Among the many options are:

Edit full name and description.
Change the account password.
Check when the password was changed the last time.
Set or unset

User cannot change password.
Password never expires.
User must change password at next logon.
Store password using reversible encryption.
Password not required.

Check the last logon and login failures.
Set account expiration date or “account never expires”.
Set or unset “account is disabled”.
Set or unset “user has to logon using a smartcard”.
Set or unset a logon script.
Define access times.
Set the user’s Home folder.
Lock or unlock the account.
Change group memberships.

For Groups, it is possible to add or remove users from groups. There are also options to create, rename or delete groups.
Closing Words
The program lusrmgr.exe is handy for home system administrators who need to make changes to accounts and don’t want to use the command prompt or PowerShell for that.
Now You: do you use lusrmgr.msc? (via Deskmodder)
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Removed and Deprecated features of Windows 10 version 2004

Microsoft released the new feature update for Windows 10, the Windows 10 May 2020 update, also known as Windows 10 version 2004, to the public this week.
The new version is being offered to select systems only via Windows Update at this point and availability will increase over the coming weeks and months. Windows users who cannot wait can download the Media Creation Toolkit to create bootable installation media to install the new version.
Microsoft introduces new features when it releases feature updates for Windows 10 but some features do get removed or deprecated. Removed means that the feature is no longer available, deprecated that it is no longer in active development and that it will be removed at a later point in time.

Here is the list of features that got removed and deprecated in Windows 10 version 2004.
Removed Features

Cortana — Cortana is not gone but the native integration of Cortana has been removed. It is replaced by a Microsoft Store application that lacks many “consumer skills” such as music or connected home of the native Cortana. The new Cortana application introduces a chat-based user interface to interact with Cortana using typed or spoken natural language queries, tighter security as it requires being signed in with a work, school or Microsoft Account, and the ability to move the Cortana window.
Windows To Go — Was deprecated in Windows 10 version 1903 and has now been removed completely. Windows To Go let you copy the Windows operating system to a USB drive.
Mobile Plans and Messaging apps — While the apps are still supported, they are no longer distributed with Windows 10. OEMs may include these applications in Windows images for cellular enabled devices.

Deprecated Features

Microsoft Edge (classic) — The classic version of Microsoft Edge is no longer under active development. Microsoft released the Chromium-based version of Microsoft Edge earlier this year and will focus development on that version.
Dynamic Disks — Designed to introduce features that basic disks do not support such as the ability to create volumes that span multiple disks or the ability to create fault-tolerant volumes. Microsoft plans to replace Dynamic Disks “fully” by Storage Spaces in future releases.
Companion Device Framework —  The framework is no longer under active development. It was designed to improve the authentication experience, e.g. by providing biometrics for Windows Hello even if the Windows 10 device does not support the required functionality (e.g. no webcam or fingerprint reader).

Now You: Will you miss any of the features? Did you use them in the past?
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Microsoft extends Graphics Driver evaluations (to improve driver quality)

Graphics drivers are a common cause for crashes and other issues on Windows systems. Microsoft uses a system that evaluates graphics drivers, e.g. by measuring crashes and hangs in games, to determine whether the driver should be rejected or pulled.
Microsoft uses the data to determine whether a system should be offered a new feature update version of Windows 10, among other things. The issues list of the recently released Windows 10 version 2004 version of Windows 10 has two driver related issues, one of which blocks the update from being offered on the device.

Microsoft’s Windows graphics team has developed three new measures that will be integrated in the evaluation of graphics drivers from June 29, 2020 on. Two of the measures look at crashes in hangs in applications, and the third one at rollbacks of drivers,
The first one analyses the number of user mode crashes in the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge web browser. It measures how often Microsoft Edge crashes because of the graphics driver and puts this in relation to all devices with that particular driver.
Microsoft looks at seven day periods and a minimum population of 30,000 hours of Microsoft Edge Chromium runtime. The calculation is: Crashes in Edge Chromium Normalized by Usage=Total Edge Chromium Crashes / Runtime in Years. The driver fails the test if that result exceeds 1.
The second measure uses a similar method as the first but instead of looking at Microsoft Edge crashes, it is looking at crashes in communication and collaboration applications.
Microsoft uses the following applications for the measure:

MICROSOFT.SKYPEAPP
DISCORD.EXE
SKYPE.EXE
TEAMVIEWER.EXE
LYNC.EXE
WECHAT.EXE
QQ.EXE
SLACK.EXE
KAKAOTALK.EXE
ZOOM.EXE
ZOOM
WHATSAPP.EXE
LINE.EXE
YOUCAMSERVICE.EXE
TELEGRAM.EXE
VIBER.EXE
MICROSOFT.SKYPEROOMSYSTEM

Minimum population is set to 10,000 hours of Communication and Collaboration Application runtime and the period is set to seven days again. The final calculation is Crashes in Communication and Collaboration Applications normalized by usage in years=Total Crashes in Communication and Collaboration Applications / Runtime in Years. The driver fails the test if the result exceeds 1.
The third and final measure analyzes driver rollbacks or re-installation in the first two days of installation. The minimum population is set to 5,000 devices and a seven day period. The driver fails the test if there are more than 10 rollbacks per 10,000 devices with the driver.
Closing Words
Microsoft started to work on improving drivers on the company’s Windows operating system in recent time and the new graphics drivers measures extend that further (it claimed in 2018 that graphics driver quality was better than ever). The company introduced an option for its hardware partners recently that allows them to request Windows Update blocks for certain drivers.
Now You: How is your recent experience with drivers on Windows?
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Microsoft extends Graphics Driver evaluations (to improve driver quality) appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Windows 10 version 2004 is here, and it has lots of issues

Microsoft released Windows 10 version 2004, also known as the May 2020 Update. The new feature update for Microsoft’s Windows operating system is available for systems running Windows 10 version 1903 or 1909 only via Windows Update, and only if users click on the “check for updates” button to search for the new version manually.
Even then, it may not be offered to the system at that point in time because of issues identified on the system and because Microsoft is rolling it out over time. In other words: the update is only offered if Microsoft’s algorithm concludes that the device is ready for the update and if your device has been picked by Microsoft.

Microsoft published a long list of known issues that have not been resolved yet on the official Windows 10 release information page. A total of ten issues are listed on the page currently; many block the new feature upgrade from being offered to devices.

Difficulty connecting to more than one Bluetooth device — Affects Windows 10 devices with certain Realtek Bluetooth radios. (update hold for affected devices)
Errors or issues during or after updating devices with Conexant ISST audio drivers — Affects Windows 10 devices with Conexant ISST audio drivers (Conexant ISST Audio or Conexant HDAudio Driver) with file names file name uci64a96.dll through uci64a231.dll and file versions lower than 7.231.3.0. (update hold for affected devices)
Errors or issues during or after updating devices with certain Conexant audio drivers — Devices with certain drivers may receive stop errors or bluescreens. Affected driver is Conexant HDAudio Driver, versions 8.65.47.53, 8.65.56.51, or 8.66.0.0 through 8.66.89.00 for chdrt64.sys or chdrt32.sys.
Issues using ImeMode property to control IME mode for individual text entry fields — Issues with some applications that use the ImeMode property, e.g. automatic switching between input methods does not work.
Variable refresh rate not working as expected on devices with Intel iGPU — Monitors with variable refresh rates (VRR) on systems with Intel integrated graphics processing unit display adapters may not work correctly. Microsoft notes that enabling VRR on affected devices won’t enable the feature for most games (especially when using DirectX 9.
Stop error when plugging or unplugging a Thunderbolt dock — Stop error or bluescreen when plugging or unplugging a Thunderbolt dock. Affected devices have at least one Thunderbolt dock, Kernel DMA protection enabled and Windows Hypervisor Platform disabled. (update hold for affected devices)
Errors or unexpected restarts for some devices using Always On, Always Connected — Devices that support the Always On, Always Connected feature may receive errors or unexpected shutdowns or restarts. Devices with more than one “Always On, Always Connected” capable network adapters are affected. (update hold for affected devices)
No mouse input with apps and games using GameInput Redistributable — Incompatibilities with some games using GameInput Redistributable that causes them to lose mouse input. (update hold for affected devices)
Issues updating or starting up devices when aksfridge.sys or aksdf.sys is present — Devices with aksfridge.sys or aksdf.sys drivers may cause the Windows 10 version 2004 upgrade to fail to install, or may prevent the system from starting after updating. (update hold for affected devices)
Issue with older drivers for Nvidia display adapters (GPU) — Affected devices with Nvidia graphics cards may receive stop errors or bluescreens. Affects devices with driver version lower than 358.00. (update hold for affected devices)

Microsoft blocks updates on certain devices automatically but not all issues that Microsoft confirmed officially have an update block in place. It is a good idea to go through the list before you start to upgrade your devices.
See our guide on blocking the May 2020 Update for Windows 10 if you want to make sure that you don’t receive the update.
Now You: Will you install the feature update on your devices?
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Windows 10 version 2004 is here, and it has lots of issues appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net