Look up deleted Microsoft KB articles

Microsoft started to use its Docs website in 2016 to publish new articles. The company retired the classic MDSN and Technet sites and migrated these to an archive on the Docs site as well.
The company started to clean up its support pages in 2018 by deleting articles on these sites. It is unclear how many articles were deleted by Microsoft but users from all over the world started to get 404 errors in their browsers when they tried to access these support articles.
One option that users have in that case is to use the Wayback Machine that is maintained by the Internet Archive. Just paste the URL of the support article to see if an archived copy is available.

The Microsoft KB Archive Search is a new solution that makes things a bit easier. It was launched on January 29, 2020 to the public.
The company that maintains it provides insight on why it created the solution:
It all started when we started to notice Microsoft was archiving/deleting Support KB articles from it’s site – often even when the information was still pertinent. We started noticing a number of the items we track in the ADCS Hotfix Digest were soft-failing when hitting the Microsoft site (no 404 error). So we weren’t even being notified by our own tools about the deletion.
When we reached out to the Microsoft product team for ADCS they weren’t even aware the articles were being archived as it wasn’t at their behest. After several weeks it became clear the articles weren’t coming back and the problem would continue to affect us all.
It provides a searchable interface that accepts KB IDs, titles, or parts of the description. The project lets users search across more than 49,000 articles of which 788 are no longer available on Microsoft’s own site.
All available results are displayed once you hit the “search in offline” button. Each item is listed with its full title, KB ID, and a short description.
A click opens the details page which provides the same information that Microsoft provided when it published the article (or updated it for the last time).
Note that you may see links that point to resources that are no longer available; you may get Technet or MSDN links that are not redirected by Microsoft. One option that you have in that case is to try to find a copy using the Wayback Machine.

Microsoft KB Archive Search provides a second option besides search. A click on “browse products” displays a long list of Microsoft products and the article count for each.
If you are looking for support articles for a particular product, e.g. .Net Framework 3.5.1, Application Server, or  Exchange Online, you may use it to find all matching articles faster. One downside is that the listing is divided into 30 pages that you need to browse one-by-one. There is no option to jump to a specific character or letter, or search for a particular product.
Tip: you can change the number in the URL to quickly jump to a page.
Closing Words
Microsoft KB Archive Search is a handy solution for administrators and users who need to access support articles that Microsoft deleted. While the Wayback Machine may work as well for individual articles, the built-in search and product browser allows you to retrieve all articles matching a particular product or service.
Now You: Do you use Microsoft support pages? (via Deskmodder)
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Look up deleted Microsoft KB articles appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Antivirus for Windows 7: support continues

All antivirus solutions remain supported on Microsoft’s Windows 7 operating system after Microsoft ended support for it on January 14, 2020.
The Windows 7 operating system has a large usage base even after support end. While the trend showed a decline for some time, latest NetMarketShare usage stats suggest that it is still installed on over 30% of desktop devices worldwide.
Enterprise customers and businesses may buy support extensions for up to three years; Microsoft decided against making the same offer to users of Home versions of Windows 7.
While Microsoft’s support ended in January, some of the company’s products and most third-party products continue to support Windows 7 at least for the time being.
Antivirus solutions are essential for devices that connect to the Internet or public networks, especially if the operating system itself is out of support and won’t receive security updates anymore.
Tip: Home users may use the solution provided by 0Patch to receive some free (some paid) security patches for Windows 7 after support end.

Antivirus solutions never provide 100% protection and that is even more so the case when it comes to operating systems that are not supported with security patches anymore. A good antivirus solution may however prevent certain attacks or reduce the impact that these attacks have, especially if it is updated regularly.
German antivirus testing institute AV Test wanted to know which antivirus solutions would continue to support Microsoft’s Windows 7 operating system after support end, and for how long.
The institute contacted antivirus companies to find out and published a table of its findings on its website. According to the information, most antivirus solutions continue to be supported on Windows 7 for at least two years. All companies continue to support their antivirus solution with signature updates for the time being.
Here is the summary:

Microsoft Security Essentials — no more program updates, but signature updates continue to be provided.
Sophos — on premise support until December 2020, cloud-managed support until June 2021.
McAfee — at least until December 2021.
F-Secure - at least until December 2021.
Avira — support ends November 2022.
AhnLab, AVG, Avast, Bitdefender, Bullgard, Carbon Black, ESET, FireEye, G Data, Ikarus, Kaspersky, K7 Computing, Microworld, PC Matic, Quickheal, Sqqrite, Symantec/NortonLifeLock, ThreatTrack / Vipre, TotalAV, Trend Micro — support for at least 2 years.

Now You: Still on Windows 7? What do you plan to do about it? (via Born)
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Source: ghacks.net

KB4532695 for Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909 fixes File Explorer Search issue

Microsoft released the cumulative update KB4532695 for the company’s Windows 10 operating system that fixes several issues including the File Explorer Search issue.
The update is available for Windows 10 version 1903 and Windows 10 version 1909 which share updates due to the nature of Windows 10 version 1909. Builds increase to version 18362.628 and 18363.628 respectively.
The updates are available via Windows Update, Microsoft Update, Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) and as direct downloads on the Microsoft Update Catalog website.
KB4532695 for Windows 10 version 1903

Support link
Direct download link

Here is what is new and changed:

Improves accuracy of Windows Hello face authentication
Fixes an unnamed Windows Mixed Reality issue.
Fixes an unmentioned issue with download notifications.
Fixes an issue that caused the order of tiles in the Start Menu to change while the layout was set to locked or partially locked.
Fixes a search issue that caused a grey box to appear when running searches in the Control Panel or in File Explorer.
Fixes a memory leak in ctfmon.exe.
Fixes a keyboard reliability issue in Windows Mixed Reality home.
Fixes a issue that prevented the Language Bar from appearing under certain circumstances.
Fixes a touch keyboard issue that caused it to close when any key is pressed.
Fixes a Indirect Display driver signing issue.
Fixes an issue with running unsigned programs when Windows Defender Application Control is in audit mode.
Fixes an issue that caused the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) to stop working.
Fixes an issue that caused an error when unplugging USB type C hub flash drives.
Fixes an Always On Virtual Private Network issue that would not remove Name Resolution Policy Table rules after disconnection.
Fixes a Print Management console issue that caused it to display script errors.
Fixes a Windows firewall issue that dropped network traffic from Modern apps such as Microsoft Edge when connecting to corporate networks using a VPN.
Fixes an issue that displayed incorrect indicators for online and offline files.
Fixes an ntdsutil.exe issue that prevented the moving of Active Directory database files.
Fixes a netdom.exe trust issue.
Fixes a compatibility status evaluation issue.
Fixes a potential memory leak in the Application Virtualization Streaming Driver.
Fixes a log corruption issue.
Fixes a code refactoring issue that increased Logical Volume Integrity Descriptors (LVID).

There are no known issues according to Microsoft.
KB4532695 for Windows 10 version 1909

Support link
Direct download link

The update for Windows 10 version 1909 includes all the changes and fixes of the update for Windows 10 version 1903 plus the following ones:

Fixes an issue that prevented users from using the right mouse button to paste Clipboard content into the search bar of File Explorer.
Fixes an issue that prevented the search bar of File Explorer from accepting user input.

Microsoft lists no know issues for the update.
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post KB4532695 for Windows 10 version 1903 and 1909 fixes File Explorer Search issue appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

That Windows 7 Wallpaper Bug Microsoft introduced? Buy ESU to get it fixed

Microsoft released a final cumulative update for the company’s Windows 7 operating system on the January 2020 Patch Day before support ended officially.
KB4534310 fixes several security issues on machines running Windows 7 including one that is rated critical.
Reports came in after the release of the update that the wallpaper on patched Windows 7 devices displayed as black.
Microsoft acknowledged the issue recently on the official KB4534310 support page stating:
After installing KB4534310, your desktop wallpaper might display as black when set to Stretch.
A workaround is provided by Microsoft. According to the information presented, the wallpaper is displayed as black only if the display mode is set to stretch.

Microsoft suggests that affected users either use a different view mode, e.g. fill, fit, or center, or select a wallpaper that matches the resolution of the display.
To mitigate the issue, you can do one of the following:
Set your custom image to an option other than Stretch, such as Fill, Fit, Tile, or Center.
Choose a custom wallpaper that matches the resolution of your desktop.
Administrators and users should not have any trouble using the workaround to resolve the black wallpaper issue. One option is to use an image editor to stretch the wallpaper to the native resolution of the device and use that edited image as the desktop background going forward.
Update: Microsoft appears to have had a change of heart. The workaround will be made available to all Windows 7 systems regardless of whether ESU is active or not:
We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release, which will be released to all customers running Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.
End
A patch is being worked on according to Microsoft, but it will only be made available to Extended Security Updates subscribers.
We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release for organizations who have purchased Windows 7 Extended Security Updates (ESU).
Extended Security Updates are only available for Enterprise and business customers.
Microsoft’s stance is quite rigorous in regards to the patch; while support for Windows 7 ended officially on January 14, 2020, it was Microsoft’s own patch that caused the issue in first place.
It would not cost Microsoft an arm and leg to release the patch for all Windows 7 devices and not exclusively for Extended Security Updates subscribers considering that the patch is developed anyway for ESU devices already.
The issue may not be critical but many customers would have probably preferred if Microsoft would have ended support without the unpatched issue.
Now You: What is your take on this? (via Ask Woody)
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post That Windows 7 Wallpaper Bug Microsoft introduced? Buy ESU to get it fixed appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Microsoft releases KB4534321 and KB4534308 for Windows 10 version 1809 and 1803

Microsoft has released two updates for the company’s Windows 10 operating system. KB4534321 for Windows 10 version 1809 and KB4534308  for Windows 10 version 1803 include non-security improvements and changes only.
Both updates are provided via Windows Update and Microsoft Update, and as direct downloads on the Microsoft Update Catalog website. Administrators may import the updates into WSUS manually as well.
KB4534308 for Windows 10 version 1803

Support link
Microsoft Update Catalog link

The update includes the following improvements and fixes:

Fixed a sign-in issue that affected Office Apps when using the Web Account Manager.
Fixed an issue with download notifications caused by “multiple short-duration tabs and redirects”.
Fixed a memory leak in ctfmon.exe that happened when an application with an editable box was refreshed.
Fixed an issue with the Out of Box Experience phase preventing the creation of local accounts if Chinese, Japanese, or Korean IME were used.
Fixed an issue in Windows Hello for Business that failed to “show the default option to sign in on Windows 10 devices”.
Fixed an Internet Explorer opening issue that was caused by roaming many favorites when using Microsoft User Experience Virtualization.
Fixed an issue that prevented a user’s settings from synchronizing across devices.
Fixed a high CPU consumption issue in Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection when using Microsoft Teams.
Fixed an issue that caused the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) process from working.
Fixed an issue affecting IP security (IPSec) Internet Key Exchange Version 1 (IKEv1) connections.
Fixed an AppContainer firewall issue that caused firewall rules to leak under certain circumstances.
Fixed an issue that could cause backups to fail across partitions.
Fixed a netdom.exe issue that failed to correctly identify trust relationships.
Fixed a memory leak issue in the Application Virtualization Streaming Driver (appvstr.sys).
Fixed a log file corruption issue.
Reliability of UE-V AppMonitor has been improved.

Windows 10 version 1803 is still affected by the long standing issue on Cluster Shared Volumes that may cause certain operations to fail and throw and error instead.
KB4534321 for Windows 10 version 1809

Support link
Microsoft Update Catalog link

The update includes the following improvements and changes:

Fixed an unnamed Windows Mixed Reality issue that occurs after upgrading to a new Microsoft Edge version.
Fixed an issue with download notifications caused by “multiple short-duration tabs and redirects”.
Fixed a Microsoft Windows Search Indexer issue that caused it to add or repair “required access control lists (ACLs) without checking if ACLs exist”.
Fixed an issue that caused devices to go into Windows Out Of Box Experience restart loops.
Fixed a settings synchronization issue.
Fixed an issue that prevented software Indirect Display drivers from being signed with multiple certificates.
Fixed a memory leak in ctfmon.exe that happened when an application with an editable box was refreshed.
Fixed an issue that prevented the Language Bar from appearing when users sign in to new sessions.
Fixed a touch keyboard issue that caused it to close when selecting any key.
Fixed a window resizing issue that prevented users from resizing windows.
Fixed a Start Menu issue that caused tiles to be reordered even though the layout was locked or partially locked.
Fixed a Registry issue that might prevent users from opening files, links or applications.
Fixed an issue that caused the Settings page to close unexpectedly.
Fixed an issue that caused Windows Search to close unexpectedly.
Fixed an issue in Windows Hello for Business that failed to “show the default option to sign in on Windows 10 devices”.
Fixed a remote PowerShell issue that prevented reporting that the session on the target had ended.
Fixed a handle leak in the EnableTraceEx2() function.
Fixed an Internet Explorer opening issue that was caused by roaming many favorites when using Microsoft User Experience Virtualization.
Fixed an issue that prevented a user’s settings from synchronizing across devices.
Fixed an issue that caused the Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS) process from working.
Addressed a Windows Defender Application Control issue that caused unsigned images to run but blocked unsigned program files in Audit mode.
Fixed a Print Management console issue that caused it to display script errors when using Extended View.
Addressed an issue with the Always On Virtual Private Network (VPN) that fails to remove the Name Resolution Policy Table (NRPT) rules after you disconnect.
Fixed an AppContainer firewall issue that caused firewall rules to leak under certain circumstances.
Fixed an issue that caused “some” systems to stop responding when operating embedded MultiMediaCard (eMMC) storage devices.
Fixed a ntdsutil.exe issue that prevented moving Active Directory database files.
Fixed a netdom.exe issue that failed to correctly identify trust relationships.
Fixed an issue that could cause backups to fail across partitions.
Fixed a Windows compatibility status evaluation issue.
Fixed an issue with the Out of Box Experience phase preventing the creation of local accounts if Chinese, Japanese, or Korean IME were used.
Fixed a log file corruption issue.
Fixed a memory leak issue in the Application Virtualization Streaming Driver (appvstr.sys).
Reliability of UE-V AppMonitor has been improved.
Perofrmance of block cloning for ReFS improved in ” scenarios that involve a large number of operations on ReFS-cloned files”.

Microsoft lists two issues, both long-standing. The first causes certain operations on Cluster Shared Volumes to fail, the second throws an error message on devices with “some Asian language packs” installed.
Now You: have you installed these updates?
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Source: ghacks.net

Windows Calculator will get a Graphing Mode: first look

Microsoft released a new build to the Fast Ring Windows Insider channel yesterday. The update increases the build to version 19546 and one of the changes that it brings along with it is the new Graphing Mode of Windows Calculator.
Windows Calculator is the built-in calculator of the Windows operating system. Microsoft improved the tool in previous Windows 10 releases, e.g. by adding an always on top functionality to it, after ignoring it for a very long time.
Tip: you can run Windows Calculator in your browser as well now (third-party port). Do this if the Windows Calculator interface is huge and you want to size it down a bit.
Windows Insiders who have upgraded to the new build already may start Windows Calculator to test the new Graphing Mode that is now supported.
Microsoft notes that it should be considered a preview right now and that graphing mode is one of the top requested features in Feedback Hub.

Besides that, it is also a tool designed for students to explore linear algebra.
Graphing capabilities are also essential for students who are beginning to explore linear algebra. With this feature, we hope to empower students to learn mathematics by improving their conceptual understanding and attitudes towards math.
Microsoft highlights a few features of Windows Calculator’s Graphing Mode in the announcement on the Windows Experience blog.

Plot equations on the graph. Graphing Mode can be used to plot one or more equations on the graph. Just enter one or multiple equations and Windows Calculator will plot them on the grpah.
Work with equations with secondary variables. You can work with equations that have secondary variables; these can be manipulated to see how different values affect the graph.
Graph analysis. You may trace plots using the mouse or keyboard to “better understand the relationship between variables in the equation on the graph. May also be used to identify key graph features.

Now You: do you use Windows Calculator?
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Source: ghacks.net

Microsoft Windows Security Updates January 2020 overview (end of Windows 7 support edition)

Welcome to the first Microsoft Patch Day overview of 2020 and the last Patch Day for the company’s Windows 7 operating system (as well as for Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2).
Microsoft released security updates for all supported client and server versions of windows on the January 2020 Patch Tuesday. The company released updates for other products, e.g. Microsoft Office, as well on this day.
The overview starts with an executive summary and the operating system distribution that lists the number of vulnerabilities and the severity rating for each supported version of Windows as well as Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer.
The list of released updates, non-security updates, security advisories, and known issues follow. You find links to direct downloads for Windows updates as well as resource links at the bottom of the guide.
Click here to open the overview of the December 2019 Windows Security updates.
Microsoft Windows Security Updates January 2020
You may download the following (zipped) Excel spreadsheet that contains a list of released updates in January 2020: windows-security-updates-january-2020
Executive Summary

This is the last Patch Day for Windows 7 unless you are a business / Enterprise and subscribed to ESU. Home users may find the “what now” article useful.
Microsoft released security updates for all client and server versions of the Windows operating system.
Other Microsoft products that received security updates are: Internet Explorer, OneDrive for Android, Microsoft Office, .Net Framework, .Net Core, Asp.net Core, Microsoft Dynamics.

Operating System Distribution

Windows 7: 18 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 17 rated important

CVE-2020-0611 | Remote Desktop Client Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows 8.1: 23 vulnerabilities: 1 rated critical and 22 rated important

same as Windows 7

Windows 10 version 1803: 29 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 28 important

same as Windows 7

Windows 10 version 1809: 29  vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 28 important

same as Windows 7

Windows 10 version 1903: 29  vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 28 important

same as Windows 7

Windows 10 version 1909: same as Windows 10 version 1903

Windows Server products

Windows Server 2008 R2: 19 vulnerabilities: 1 critical and 12 important.

CVE-2020-0611 | Remote Desktop Client Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows Server 2012 R2: 26 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 23 important.

CVE-2020-0609 | Windows Remote Desktop Gateway (RD Gateway) Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-0610 | Windows Remote Desktop Gateway (RD Gateway) Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
CVE-2020-0611 | Remote Desktop Client Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

Windows Server 2016: 31 vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 28 important.

same as Windows Server 2012 R2

Windows Server 2019: 33  vulnerabilities: 3 critical and 30 are important

same as Windows Server 2012 R2

Other Microsoft Products

Internet Explorer 11: 1 vulnerability: 1 critical

CVE-2020-0640 | Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability

Microsoft Edge: none
Microsoft Edge on Chromium: none

Windows Security Updates
Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1

Monthly Rollup: KB4534310 
Security Only: KB4534314 

Improvements and fixes:

Security updates to the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server.

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012

Monthly Rollup: KB4534297 
Security Only: KB4534309 

Improvements and fixes:

Fixes an issue with the new SameSite cookie policies for Google Chrome 80.
Security updates to the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server.

Windows 10 version 1803

Support article: KB4534293

Improvements and fixes:

Security updates to the Microsoft Scripting Engine, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Virtualization, Windows Storage and Filesystems, and Windows Server .

Windows 10 version 1809

Support article: KB4534273 

Improvements and fixes:

Fixes an issue with the new SameSite cookie policies for Google Chrome 80.
Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Management, Windows Cryptography, Windows Virtualization, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server.

Windows 10 version 1903

Support article: KB4528760 

Improvements and fixes:

Security updates to Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Management, Windows Cryptography, Windows Storage and Filesystems, the Microsoft Scripting Engine, and Windows Server.

Windows 10 version 1909

Support article: KB4528760 

Improvements and fixes:

Same as Windows 10 version 1903

Other security updates

KB4534251 — Cumulative security update for Internet Explorer: January 14, 2020
KB4532927 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532928 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532929 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008
KB4532930 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532931 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532932 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008
KB4532939 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532940 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532941 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532944 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 for Windows Server 2008
KB4532945 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5.1 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4532946 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532950 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532934 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1703
KB4532935 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1709
KB4532936 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1803
KB4532937 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019
KB4532938 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.8 for Windows Server 2019, Windows 10 Version 1903, and Windows 10 Version 1909
KB4532947 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.7.2 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019
KB4534271 — Cumulative Update for Windows Server 2016, and Windows 10 Version 1607
KB4534276 — Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1709
KB4534296 — Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1703
KB4534306 — Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1507
KB4532933 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 version 1607 and Windows Server 2016
KB4535101 — Cumulative Update for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.7.2 and 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1809, and Windows Server 2019
KB4535102 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5.1, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
KB4534976 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5.1, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
KB4532951 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4536952 — Servicing Stack Update for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4532952 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4532958 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532959 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 2.0 for Windows Server 2008
KB4532960 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5.1 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4532961 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532962 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532963 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532964 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.5.2 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008
KB4532969 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4532970 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4532971 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and Windows Server 2008
KB4534283 — Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4534288 — Security Only Quality Update for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4534303 — Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows Server 2008
KB4534312 — Security Only Quality Update for Windows Server 2008
KB4534976 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5.1 for Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4534977 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4534978 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4534979 — Security Only Update for .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0, 4.5.2, 4.6 for Windows Server 2008
KB4535102 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5.1 on Windows Embedded Standard 7, Windows 7, and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4535103 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 3.5, 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4535104 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 4.5.2, 4.6, 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.7, 4.7.1, 4.7.2, 4.8 for Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4535105 — Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 2.0 on Windows Server 2008
KB4536953 — Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server 2008
KB4528759 — Servicing Stack Update for Windows Server, version 1903, Windows Server, version 1909, Windows 10 Version 1903, and Windows 10 Version 1909
KB4528760 — Cumulative Update for Windows Server, version 1903, Windows Server, version 1903, Windows 10 Version 1903, and Windows 10 Version 1909

Here is the master list of all released security updates.
Known Issues
Windows 8.1 and Server 2012 R2

Long standing issue: certain rename operations on files or folders on Cluster Shared Volumes may fail.

Windows 10 version 1803

Same as Windows 8.1 plus
Issue with creating local user accounts during the Out of Box Experience.

Windows 10 version 1809

Same as Windows 10 version 1803 plus
Devices with certain Asian language packs may throw the error 0x800f0982 - PSFX_E_MATCHING_COMPONENT_NOT_FOUND.

Security advisories and updates

Non-security related updates

KB4486081 — Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4486105 — Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 8.1, Windows RT 8.1, and Windows Server 2012 R2
KB4486129 — Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1607, Windows 10 Version 1703, and Windows Server 2016
KB4486153 — Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 10 Version 1803, Windows 10 Version 1809, Windows 10 Version 1709, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019
KB4492872 — Internet Explorer 11 for Windows Embedded 8 Standard and Windows Server 2012
KB4503548 — Microsoft .NET Framework 4.8 for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
KB4534726 — Dynamic Update for Windows 10 Version 1903, and Windows 10 Version 1909
KB890830 — Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool - January 2020

Microsoft Office Updates
You find Office update information here.
How to download and install the January 2020 security updates

The security updates are made available via Windows Update, WSUS, and other updating tools and services. Most home users get the updates automatically via Windows Updates; those who do not want to wait for Windows to pick up the newly released updates can run a manual check for updates to speed up the process.
Note: we recommend that important data is backed up before any updates are installed.
Do this to run a manual check for updates:

Open the Start Menu of the Windows operating system, type Windows Update and select the result.
Select check for updates in the application that opens. Updates may be installed automatically when they are found or offered by Windows; this depends on the operating system and version that is used, and update settings.

Direct update downloads
Windows 7 SP1 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP

KB4534310 — 2020-01 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7
KB4534314 — 2020-01 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 7

Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2

KB4534297 — 2020-01 Security Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 8.1
KB4534309 — 2020-01 Security Only Quality Update for Windows 8.1

Windows 10 (version 1803)

KB4534293 — 2020-01 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1809)

KB4534273  — 2020-01 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1809

Windows 10 (version 1903)

KB4528760 — 2020-01 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1903

Windows 10 (version 1909)

KB4528760 — 2020-01 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 Version 1909

Additional resources

January 2020 Security Updates release notes
List of software updates for Microsoft products
List of the latest Windows Updates and Services Packs
Security Updates Guide
Microsoft Update Catalog site
Our in-depth Windows update guide
How to install optional updates on Windows 10
Windows 10 Update History
Windows 8.1 Update History
Windows 7 Update History

Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Microsoft Windows Security Updates January 2020 overview (end of Windows 7 support edition) appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Clear Disk Info is a handy health info tool for storage devices

Clear Disk Info is a free software program for Microsoft Windows devices that provides a clear view of health related information about connected storage devices.
Keeping an eye on storage devices is essential when you work with computer systems. A storage device failure could lead to data loss or corruption of system files that prevent certain functionality or the system from booting at all.
It is a good idea to create regular backups of important files to make sure that data is not lost when storage devices start to fail but keeping an eye on these devices to replace them before that happens is even better.
Clear Disk Info can be run from any location after you have downloaded it from the developer website. The program scans all connected storage devices and displays them in its interface afterwards. It supports Solid State Drives, platter-based hard drives and Flash drives, and displays them in the sidebar on launch. You just need to make sure that the storage device is connected so that it can be analyzed. The listing is not refreshed automatically but you can enable that option in the menu or refresh on demand.

Each storage device that is listed in the sidebar has its name, size, temperature, speed/life left, status, and powered-on hours listed next to it which should help identify the devices that you want to check out.
Just select one of the devices displayed in the sidebar to see its values in the main area. The program helps users by highlighting important and critical bits of information, and using color codes.
Critical and important information, e.g. the device’s temperature, power-on hours, reallocated sectors or predicted failure, are highlighted with icons (yellow and red) and it is a good idea to start looking at these values first.
Information that is highlighted in green indicates that the detected readings are okay and that there is no need to worry about those.
You can go through the listing one-by-one easily to check the health of any of the devices listed in the sidebar; this makes Clear Disk Info a handy tool to quickly go through the S.M.A.R.T. readings of all connected storage devices.
The menu lists options to check disks for errors, check and repair disks, and to optimize disks. Shortcuts are linked to these options for even faster access. The information can be exported to a text file using the menu as well.
Closing Words
Clear Disk Info is a straightforward program for Windows to check the health of all storage devices connected to the system it is run on. It may not be the most feature rich program for that but it is quick and easy to use.
Now You: do you check/monitor the health of storage devices? (via Deskmodder)
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Clear Disk Info is a handy health info tool for storage devices appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Windows 7 Support ends today: here are your options

Microsoft’s Windows 7 operating system has reached the end of its lifetime, at least for home users. Microsoft will release a final round of patches for the operating system later today before support ends. While there is a chance that critical patches will be provided after support end, as it happened previously with other versions of Windows that ran out of support, it is fair to say that these will be an exception rather than something that will happen frequently.
If you still run Windows 7 on a home system or work on a Windows 7 machine in an organization, you have a couple of options when it comes to using your devices.
First, the good news: while Microsoft will end its support for the operating system, many popular software programs will continue to receive updates for quite some time. Google announced recently that it will support Chrome on Windows 7 for at least 18 months, and programs like Steam, Firefox, and even Microsoft Edge will continue to be supported for the time being.
Option 1: Switch to a supported version of Windows

Two versions of Windows are supported by Microsoft after support ends for Windows 7. There is Windows 8.1 which will be supported until 2023 and Windows 10, which will be supported indefinitely it appears.
The upgrade to Windows 10 is still free for users that have a genuine Windows 7 product key. Microsoft ended these free upgrades officially in 2016 but never stopped the process. We revealed why that is the case and that this is a deliberate decision by the company and not an oversight.
Some Windows users may not want to upgrade to Windows 10 as it is quite hungry for Telemetry data. There are tools available to improve privacy but it is fair to say that most users won’t be able to prevent the operating system from sending Telemetry data to Microsoft.
These users may select to upgrade to Windows 8.1 instead. It is closer to Windows 7 in many regards and will be supported for another three years before support runs out. Downside to upgrading to Windows 8.1 is that a key is needed and that this product key needs to be purchased. Cheap keys are available on different marketplaces such as eBay, and buying them may be legal in your jurisdiction.
If the PC is rather old, you could also consider purchasing a new device entirely and maybe get a license for Windows 8.1 or 10 that way. Considering that a retail key costs more than 100 Dollars, it is often cheaper to buy a new PC that includes such a key.
Option 2: Stay on Windows 7 for a while longer
Windows 7 won’t just stop working after January 14, 2020. The operating system continues to function just like before and the only change is that it won’t receive official security updates anymore.
That’s a problem that users who stay on Windows 7 face; this may not be dangerous of the PC is not connected to the Internet and used only locally.
Good security software, including a proper firewall and antivirus solution that is still updated, is a must in this case.
Third-party company 0Patch revealed in 2019 that it will release security updates for Windows 7 after Microsoft support ends. Not all of them will be free and there is a chance that it will only create some security updates and not all considering that its resources are limited.
Another option is to use a bypass that was detected recently. It is still up for debate whether Microsoft will find a way to disable it. Basically, what it does is enable ESU updates on systems that are have not joined the program.
ESU is the Extended Security Updates program that Enterprise and business customers may use to extend support for Windows 7 for up to three years.
Option 3: ESU (Enterprise and business only)
Enterprise customers and businesses may purchase ESU subscriptions to receive security updates after January 14, 2020. Enterprise customers buy these per users and small businesses per machine. The subscription cost doubles per year but it is a good option for organizations that need more time to migrate the systems or need to use Windows 7 because of legacy programs that they run that are not compatible with newer versions of Microsoft’s operating system.
Option 4: Switch to Linux
If the upgrade to Windows 8.1 or 10 is not an option and staying on Windows 7 is not either, there is only Linux that users may select to migrate to. You can check out our preparation guides on migrating from Windows 7 to Linux which cover backup and media creation, and other preparations.
There are plenty of Linux distributions to choose from and if you are just getting started, it is easy to get overwhelmed by the choice.
Here is a short list of distributions that you may want to check out initially:

Ubuntu
Linux Mint
Manjaro
Zorin OS

There are hundreds more and you can very well spend days comparing the different distributions to find out which one is best suitable for your use cases.
Now You: do you still run Windows 7? What do you plan to do after January 14, 2020?
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Windows 7 Support ends today: here are your options appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net

Rumor: Windows 10 Store for Business and Education are going away

When Microsoft launched the Windows 10 operating system in 2015, it included a Windows Store application designed as a central repository for applications and other offers. One of the main ideas behind Windows 10 was to get users to shift from using Win32 applications — the classic Windows programs — to Windows apps that were distributed via the Store.
The strategy backfired as users and organizations ignored Store applications for the most part. Microsoft did launch separate stores for businesses and for Education, called Windows Store for Business and Store for Education, but these too were underachievers.
The two stores were designed to give administrators additional options in regards to distributing applications and use them to manage custom applications.

It appears that the time has come for the Windows Store for Business and Education. A new article on ZDnet by Mary Jo Foley suggests that Microsoft may deprecate the stores this year. Mary Jo cites unnamed sources within Microsoft but Microsoft has not provided an official statement regarding the two stores.
Microsoft shifted its strategy in regards to the main Microsoft Store (formerly known as Windows Store) in 2019 from an all-in approach to making it one (of many) means of distribution. Even that Store may not survive in its current form as it is possible that it won’t be included in future versions of Windows 10 anymore (but remain available on the Web).
As far as the stores for Business and Education are concerned, Mary Jo reports that these stores will be deprecated. She suggests that June 30, 2020 may mark the end for these stores or is the date that customers are informed that the stores are deprecated.
Deprecated does not necessarily mean that the stores are removed immediately. It is quite possible that Microsoft will announce the deprecation on June 30, 2020 but will keep the Stores on light maintenance and open for a period of time. Organizations that use the Store would probably want more than just a couple of months to shift certain Store-related things to other means of distribution.
It remains to be seen how all of this will play out in 2020. For now, it is filed under rumor as there has been no official confirmation or denial by Microsoft.
Now You: Have you used any of the Microsoft App stores in the past?
Thank you for being a Ghacks reader. The post Rumor: Windows 10 Store for Business and Education are going away appeared first on gHacks Technology News.
Source: ghacks.net